Old South Haven Storm Water Improvements

Old South Haven Storm Water Improvements

 

Project Status & Timelines (UPDATED 9/15/20)

The Porter County Department of Development & Storm Water Management (Department) has undertaken an important effort to repair and reconstruct the storm water infrastructure serving Old South Haven, which is located in unincorporated Porter County, and is bounded by US 6 to the north, SR 149 to the east, CR 700 N to the south, and McCool Rd. to the west. The effort began in November 2018, and while the COVID-19 pandemic has certainly impacted our operations this year, we have continued our efforts to maintain, repair, and improve Porter County’s valuable road, bridge, and storm water infrastructure, and that certainly includes our efforts to repair and reconstruct the storm water infrastructure serving Old South Haven!

 

Such effort, designated as the Old South Haven Storm Water Improvements Project (Project) has been broken up into two phases. The projects included in Phase 1 include:

 

  • Northeast Storm Sewer Project (Substantially Complete)
  • South Central Storm Sewer Project (Underway)
  • Storm Sewer System Lining & Rehabilitation Project (Underway)
  • Squirrel Creek Diversion & Midway Drive Detention Basin Expansion Project
  1. Phase 1 – Midway Dr. Detention Basin Expansion Project (Underway)
  2. Phase 2 – Squirrel Creek Diversion Project (Bidding)
  • Squirrel Creek Improvements Project (Engineering & Design)

 

Each of these projects has its own unique challenges and required the completion of its own project-specific scope of work, which were developed in coordination and collaboration with the qualified professional consultants selected to assist with the effort. Some of the projects required more intensive design, involving tasks including, but not limited to, establishing storm sewer structure rim and invert elevations, determining pipe sizing, developing storm sewer and storm sewer structure details and construction requirements, setting storm sewer structure (e.g., curb inlets, catch basins, manhole) locations, conducting roadway design (e.g., establishing geometric layout and pavement grade elevations), developing restoration details and construction requirements, and coordinating with utilities to resolve any conflicts between existing utilities and the proposed improvements. The storm sewer system lining & rehabilitation project involved confirming the applicability of pipe lining, confirming pipe sizing and alignment, determining and developing construction requirements for the proper pipe lining method(s), setting access point (i.e., storm sewer structure) locations, and developing access point (i.e., storm sewer structure) details and construction requirements.

 

Additional information about the status of each of the projects is provided below.

 

Northeast Storm Sewer Project

The first of the projects to be undertaken in Old South Haven was the Northeast Storm Sewer Project. At this point, the project has reached substantial completion, with only final punch list, restoration, and miscellaneous work items still to be completed. 

 

Work began back in Nov. 2018 on the Northeast Storm Sewer Project, which was designed to address long-standing flooding, drainage, and road pavement condition issues in northeast Old South Haven, along Governor Rd. and adjacent roadways, including LaHonda Dr., Fox River Rd., Eagle Creek Rd., Devonshire Rd., Capitol Rd., and Baltimore Rd. The Northeast Storm Sewer Project, which was managed by the Porter Co. Dept. of Development & Storm Water Management, designed by DLZ Indiana, LLC, and built by Grimmer Construction, Inc., serves the area generally bound by US 6 to the north, SR 149 to the east, Midway Dr. to the south, and Imperial Rd. to the west. The area has long suffered from flooding and drainage issues, especially Governor Rd. between Midway Dr. and LaHonda Dr.

 

The project included the installation of over one mile – 5,600 LF – of new reinforced concrete pipe storm sewers ranging in size from 18” to 54” under portions of Governor Rd., LaHonda Dr., Fox River Rd., Eagle Creek Rd., Capitol Rd., Baltimore Rd., and Acadia Rd. More than 100 new storm sewer structures, including more than 60 inlets were installed along the project reach to allow storm water runoff to enter the new storm sewer system instead of ponding on roads and in adjacent yards. Old, deteriorated corrugated metal pipe storm sewers serving the project area were abandoned in place and filled with grout to prevent future sinkholes and settlement over the old pipe.

 

Since the new storm sewers were installed under the roads, the project also included complete reconstruction of the right-of-way, including turf grass areas, sidewalks, curbs and gutters, driveway approaches, and roads, to not only address the flooding and drainage issues, but also long-standing road pavement condition issues. The result is a project that has not only updated the road and storm water infrastructure serving the area, but has completely transformed it.

 

We will be working with the contractor over the next few weeks to complete the final remaining punch list, restoration, and miscellaneous work items and to wrap up the project. Several representative photographs of the project, at the time it reached substantial completion, are presented below.

 

Governor Rd., looking south near LaHonda Dr.

Governor Rd., looking south from near LaHonda Dr. 

Governor Rd. and Midway Dr., looking north from Governor Rd.

Governor Rd. & Midway Dr., looking north from Governor Rd.

Devonshire Rd., looking north from the project limits.

Devonshire Rd., looking north from the project limits.


South Central Storm Sewer Project

The Department is happy to announce that this project, the second of our capital improvement projects to be undertaken in Old South Haven, is nearing substantial completion!

 Work began back in late Mar. 2020 on the South Central Storm Sewer Project, which was designed to address long-standing flooding, drainage, and road pavement condition issues in south central Old South Haven, along CR 700 N, Juniper Rd., Pinewood Dr., and adjacent roadways, including Coventry Rd., Fremont Rd., Imperial Rd., and Heritage Rd. The South Central Storm Sewer Project, which is being managed by the Porter Co. Dept. of Development & Storm Water Management, was designed by American Structurepoint, Inc., and is being built by Gough, Inc., serves the area generally bound by Midway Dr. to the north, Governor Rd. to the east, CR 700 N to the south, and Long Run Rd. to the west. The area has long suffered from flooding and drainage issues, especially Pinewood Dr. between Coventry Rd. and Fremont Rd. 

 At this point, all of the new storm sewer has been installed, all of the asphalt paving has been completed, and all pavement markings are now in place . Most of the appurtenant work items have been completed at this point, including construction of the retaining wall and detention basin improvements at the downstream end of the project in Haven Hollow Park.

Recently, the contractor (Gough, Inc.) has been working to prepare all of the parkway, lawn, and other “green” areas for restoration, including sodding of the parkway areas. We anticipate that the restoration work will be completed within the next two weeks. 

 We will of course have punch list and miscellaneous items that will need to be addressed as we move toward completion, but a number of these have already been addressed or will be addressed by the contractor or by others. 

The Department believes that we have delivered yet another project that has not only addressed the flooding and drainage issues affecting the project area, but also (at least some of) the long-standing road pavement condition issues. 

Several representative photographs of the project are presented below.

Looking West at intersection of Juniper Rd. & Pinewood Dr.   #P14-044 - Looking west at the intersection of Juniper Rd. & Pinewood Dr., preparing for sodding

North on Juniper #P19-044 - Looking north on Juniper Rd., preparing for sodding

Looking South on Heritage Rd. #P19-044 - Looking south on Heritage Rd., preparing for sodding

South on Fremont #19-044 - Looking south on Fremont Rd., preparing for sodding

#P19-044 - Retaining/landscape feature wall at downstream end of project in Haven Hollow Park


Storm Sewer System Lining & Rehabilitation Project

The Department is happy to announce that this project, the third of our capital improvement projects to be undertaken in Old South Haven, is well underway and progressing well! 

 

Storm Sewer System Lining & Rehabilitation

The Porter Co. Dept. of Development & Storm Water Management is happy to announce that this project, the third of our capital improvement projects to be undertaken in Old South Haven is in full swing!

 

This is the Department’s effort to perform trenchless, in-situ reconstruction of almost 3 miles of storm sewers throughout Old South Haven through the cured-in-place pipe lining process. Work began on this project back in late April 2020 and has continued throughout the summer. Performing this work via trenchless methods has allowed the Department to perform much needed repair and reconstruction of most of the storm sewers in Old South Haven without using traditional “dig and replace” techniques through rear and side yards and without the associated impacts to trees, fences, sheds, landscaping, and other improvements that property owners have made throughout the years.

 

Recent work on the project has included work by the contractor (SAK Construction) to line the existing deteriorating corrugated metal pipe (CMP) storm sewers in southeast Old South Haven, generally south of Midway Dr. on Baltimore Rd., Capital Rd., and Devonshire Rd. The subcontractors (Gatlin Plumbing, Elite Pipeline) have continued to prepare the system for the cured-in-place lining process. At this point, the cleaning and televising subcontractor (Elite Pipeline) has nearly completed their pre-lining cleaning and televising work to facilitate the lining of the storm sewers throughout Old South Haven, and should be wrapping up in the next week or so, and the excavation subcontractor (Gatlin Plumbing) has replaced a significant number of storm sewer structures throughout Old South Haven and restoration work has begun around a number of the new structures.

 

The cured-in-pipe lining process uses a liner (i.e., felt tube) that has been saturated with polyester resin. The liner is inserted into the storm sewer system through a storm sewer structure and then pulled through and fitted to the pipe. Once in place, steam is used to cure the resin. As the resin cures, it forms a tight-fitting, jointless, and corrosion-resistant pipe inside of the old, deteriorated pipe. The sketch below illustrates the process.

 

Cured-in-place (CIPP) lining process#P20-001 - Cured-in-place (CIPP) lining process

As mentioned above, the liner used to rehabilitate pipe is saturated with polyester resin. A major component of the polyester resin is styrene. Styrene has a distinct odor that can be detected even when present at extremely low levels. People living near or with direct storm sewer connections to pipes undergoing the cured-in-place pipe lining process may notice a scent in the air or even in their home. Although the odor may be pungent to some, it is generally not hazardous at the concentrations found while the work is being performed, and generally dissipates within a day or two after the process has been completed.

 

The cured-in-place pipe lining process requires that the storm sewers be mostly still intact in order to be able to successfully insert and install the liners. In cases where the pipe has fully deteriorated (e.g., bottom of the pipe has rusted completely away), the pipe needs to be replaced before it can be successfully lined. There have been several of these “point repairs” that we have had to conduct throughout the subdivision and have a few more to complete before the project wraps up toward the end of the year. 

 

There has also been the need for a significant amount of additional heavy cleaning to remove concrete, asphalt, and other difficult to remove debris from the storm sewer, particularly along the bottom of the pipe and at the pipe joints. You may recall that during the first half of 2019, we worked to clean and televise all of the storm sewers that are now being lined as part of this project to confirm pipe size, alignment, and condition and to prepare them for this project. In mid-2019, that cleaning and televising work reached substantial completion, with nearly 300 tons of debris (!) having been removed from the storm sewers that were cleaned as part of the project. The debris removed from the storm sewers included typical storm sewer debris, but also a staggering amount of construction debris, including, but not limited to, broken concrete, broken asphalt, concrete block, brick, lumber, fence posts, and chain link fence, In the end, more than 40 LB/LF of debris (!) was removed from the storm sewers that were cleaned and televised as part of this project. A staggering amount of debris! This time around, the additional heavy cleaning was needed simply to finish removing the rest of this debris and to prepare the storm sewers for the lining process – and a lot less had to be removed!


Squirrel Creek Diversion & Midway Drive Detention Basin Expansion Project

This project will serve west Old South Haven, and will include the installation of a 54 inch diameter storm sewer that will intercept surface water passing through Squirrel Creek and route it north along McCool Rd. and then east along Midway Dr. to an existing detention basin located on the north side of Midway Dr., just west of Timberline Pkwy., adjacent to South Haven Elementary School. Surface water can then be metered out through the pond’s outlet structure into the 48 inch diameter storm sewer running from south to north, adjacent to the pond. In order to accommodate the larger volume and increased flow rate of surface water routed to the pond, the pond will be expanded. The proposed expansion will grade the pond out to the limits of the property owned by the Twin Creeks Conservancy District and reshape the interior of the pond to maximize storage, provide an adequately sloped pond bottom, and introduce design elements, including native vegetation and microtopography, to address water quality as well as water quantity.

Design and engineering of this project has been completed, and the current plan is for the project to be implemented in two phases. The first phase will be managed by the Porter Co. Dept. of Development & Storm Water Management and will include the Midway Dr. Detention Basin Expansion. The Department is currently working with CBBEL to finalize the bidding and contract documents for this project, with construction planned for the summer and fall of 2020. The second phase will potentially be managed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, with oversight from the Porter Co. Dept. of Development & Storm Water Management, and will include the Squirrel Creek Diversion. Construction of the second phase is planned for the spring and summer of 2021.

Several representative photographs of the project are presented below.


CIPP steam curing - Long Run Rd#P20-001 - Steam curing of a CIPP liner on Long Run Rd., south of Midway Dr. 

CIPP steam curing 2 - Long Run Rd

#P20-001 - Steam curing of a CIPP liner on Long Run Rd., south of Midway Dr. 


SUMMARY

Based on the current project status, projected construction dates for the projects included in Phase 1 of the Project are presented below.

  • Northeast Storm Sewer Project – Fall 2018–Fall 2020
  • South Central Storm Sewer Project – Spring 2020–Fall 2020
  • Storm Sewer System Lining & Rehabilitation Project – Spring 2020–Winter 2020/2021
  • Squirrel Creek Diversion & Midway Dr. Detention Basin Expansion Project –
    1. Midway Dr. Detention Basin Expansion – Summer 2020–Fall 2020
    2. Squirrel Creek Diversion – Spring 2021–Fall 2021
  • Squirrel Creek Improvements Project – Fall 2021–Spring 2022

 

DISCLAIMER: Projected construction dates subject to change during the project planning and design process. Project construction dates have been staggered to minimize the impact of construction on vehicle traffic, pedestrian traffic, and quality of life throughout Old South Haven.